Image contributed by @IvanBliminse235

Vitalik Buterin, founder and designer of Ethereum, recently responded to a tweet by Elon Musk about increasing the block size and block times of DogeCoin by 10x and lowering the fees by 100x with a bit of a lecture on the limits of blockchain scalability.

I appreciate that Vitalik is taking this issue public and so I thought this might be a good time to wade into the fray to look at these issues from a Holochain context. Much of what they want suggests a Holochain solution. …


You may have already heard about the new Holochain, known informally as Holochain “RSM”, for “refactored state model”. This article dives into what’s actually new about it from a technical and architectural standpoint.

I have organized this overview into three main sections:

  1. Ensuring rigorous correctness in Holochain’s structure and code
  2. Changes to the HDK and app-developer experience
  3. Performance and Security Enhancements

First, though, a few quick highlights of the new software:

Highlights of Holochain RSM compared to the previous version:

  • At least 10,000 times faster
  • Uses 1/10th the memory
  • Compiles twice as fast
  • Relies on a much more maintainable codebase
  • Already structurally poised to switch to full P2P networking


The Nextnet Series: Part 3 of 3

In collaboration with Josh Zemel

The first and second chapters in this series explored the nature of unenclosable carriers and their potential to underpin an unprecedented explosion of human creativity and social flourishing. We suggest starting with parts 1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, and 2.4 if you haven’t already.

This final installment delves into the unenclosable carrier Holochain specifically, including how it fulfills on the essential properties of unenclosability and how it can be used.

We’ll also look at how you can get started building new social organisms now — and start to leverage Holochain to solve problems associated with enclosability…


The NextNet Series Part 2.4 of 3: Saving the Planet

In collaboration with Josh Zemel

Here we continue the exploration of how unencloseable carriers could free us from critical limitations across a number of macro-systemic domains and help unleash an explosion of human creativity and social organizing. We recommend starting with Part 1: Unencloseable Carriers and the Future of Communication — as well as Part 2.1 on food systems, Part 2.2 on energy systems, and Part 2.3 on financial systems— before reading Part 2.4 here.

In this article, we look at saving the planet.

The problem:

There are many problems in this territory: we are outstripping the carrying capacity of our ecosystem…


The NextNet Series Part 2.3 of 3: Creating Financial Systems That Work for Everyone

In collaboration with Josh Zemel

Here we continue the exploration of how unencloseable carriers could free us from critical limitations across a number of macro-systemic domains and help unleash an explosion of human creativity and social organizing. We recommend starting with Part 1: Unencloseable Carriers and the Future of Communication as well as Part 2.1 on food systems and Part 2.2 on energy systems, before reading Part 2.3 here.

In this article, we look at creating financial systems that work for everyone.

The problem:

People work far longer hours than they did in pre-industrial times yet consistently struggle to “get ahead” [1]…


The NextNet Series Part 2.2 of 3: Solving the Energy Crisis

in collaboration with Josh Zemel

Here we continue the exploration of how unencloseable carriers could free us from critical limitations across a number of macro-systemic domains and help unleash an explosion of human creativity and social organizing. We recommend starting with Part 1: Unencloseable Carriers and the Future of Communication as well as Part 2.1: Restoring the Quality of Our Food, before reading Part 2.2 here.

In this article, we look at solving the energy crisis.

The problem:

Humans are using the planet’s energy stores faster than they can replenish. This appears to be a function of our reliance on cheap but…


The NextNet Series Part 2.1 of 3: Restoring the Quality of Our Food

In collaboration with Josh Zemel

The first chapter in this three-chapter series explored unenclosability as an essential property of non-corruptible communication channels. We suggest heading there, if you haven’t already, before reading this article.

This chapter explores what becomes possible in a universe of unenclosable carriers. It’s the “why this matters” part of the series. For readability, we’re splitting this chapter into four posts — 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, and 2.4.

Over the four posts we look at four macro-systemic domains — food, energy, money, and our impact on planetary ecosystems — from the standpoint of how the dynamics of carrier…


The Nextnet Series: Part 1 of 3

In collaboration with Josh Zemel

All communication relies on one or more carriers. At the most basic level, when you’re speaking to a group of people in a room, the air is the carrier for the sound waves moving through it. You pass breath through your vocal chords and shape your mouth in funny ways, and a bunch of compression waves emerge and fill the room with information that others then decode. No one can just grab the words out of the air to stop them from reaching someone else. The carrier is unenclosable.

For the sake of contrast, let’s…


In collaboration with Josh Zemel

Fast out of the Gate: From Conception to Use

On New Years Eve, the last day of 2016, Eric Harris-Braun and I started building Holochain. The basic design came from one part of Ceptr, an advanced computing and currencies platform we’d been working on for years.

Two months later, on the first week of March 2017, we had our first Hackathon in San Francisco for people to build apps on Holochain.

It was an invitation-only event for friends who understood our tools were not yet mature. …


With the release of Holo’s Closed Alpha test network, I thought this would be a good time to share about the apps available for hosting on Holo. While there’s not a huge ecosystem yet, the apps we’re releasing are kind of a big deal, both for their individual capabilities and for their usefulness as building blocks for further app development.

Let’s have a look at the apps and why they matter.

DeepKey — Key Management

Something that continues to amaze me about the crypto space is how major hacking and thieving events are considered par for the course. How many times do we need…

Arthur Brock

Culture hacker, software architect, & targeted currencies geek… Building bridges to the next economy & network society. http://ArtBrock.com

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